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iBuildApp Unveils iPhone And Android Source Code For Mobile App Developers

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(Burlingame, CA)—By the year 2018, telecommunications research surveys indicate that over one-third of consumers worldwide (approximately 2.56 billion people) will own smartphones. Because smartphones rneed applications in order to run properly, this presents a tremendous opportunity for business owners and mobile app developers to reach an unprecedented number of consumers right where they are.

It is with this opportunity in mind that iBuildApp, a premier mobile app development platform, is unveiling its Apple iPhone and Google Android source code for the mobile apps it creates. The iBuildApp team has been developing this source code for the last 4.5 years and is now ready to share it with any Apple or android open source developer who uses the system. The company’s iOS and Android apps are already available on GitHub for developers and are widely used by the mobile development community.

Rafael Soultanov, a spokesperson for iBuildApp, stated “iBuildApp’s purpose is to make it extremely simple for business owners and developers to create custom mobile apps that fit their needs. With a drag-and-drop interface, custom app widgets and features are never any more than just a few clicks away. What makes iBuildApp stand out from other similar services and software is that it completely eliminates any technical barrier that anyone would face to building feature-rich mobile apps.”

Soultanov goes on to say, “What releasing our source code does is allow mobile app developers to see exactly how the apps run. Knowing the specifics behind the source code makes it easier for developers get a full understanding of how the apps work. It is our hope that every Android or apple mobile developer will use this new understanding to build more advanced apps that truly fit the mobile app market’s current needs.”

“With over one-third of the population expected to own smartphones within the next three years, being able to develop the best apps that give those people exactlywhat they need is crucial. We have previously released the source code for mobile widgets as well as the android and iOS sdk . The iBuildApp team has plans in place to continue releasing additional codes that will allow developers to continue on in their work of creating and offering only the best and most innovative mobile apps.”

About iBuildApp:

iBuildApp is an easy-to-use mobile app creation, hosting and management platform that allows businesses to create and publish an iPhone or Android app in a matter of minutes. The solution-based web interface has widgets for just about anything a business owner may want to provide to their customers, including contact information, coupons, audio and video, RSS, and social media feeds. With a design and widgets marketplace that offers graphic designers and developers a place to sell mobile templates and custom modules for businesses and individuals to drag and drop right into their app, iBuildApp’s ultimate goal is to help businesses create the perfect mobile application with just a few mouse clicks.

Media Contact:

Rafael Soultanov
Burlingame, CA 94010
Telephone: (415) 812-1504
Email: contacts@ibuildapp.com
Website:

Source: http://www.newschannel6now.com/story/30479481/news

ArcPy and ArcGIS: Geospatial Analysis with Python

ArcPy and ArcGIS - Geospatial Analysis with Python

ArcPy and ArcGIS: Geospatial Analysis with Python
by Silas Toms

ArcGIS allows for complex analyses of geographic information. The ArcPy module is used to script these ArcGIS analyses, providing a productive way to perform geo-analyses and to automate map production.

This book will guide you from basic Python scripting to advanced ArcPy script tools. This book starts off with setting up your Python environment, demonstrates a complex ArcPy script tool with multiple iterations, illustrates data access module cursors, and explains how to use ArcPy Geometry classes. Then, you will learn how to output maps using ArcPy.Mapping, and how to create ArcGIS script tools.

With the help of this book, you will be able to create repeatable analyses reducing the time-consuming nature of GIS, making you into a GIS professional as powerful as a whole team.

What You Will Learn

  • Understand how to integrate Python into ArcGIS and make GIS analysis faster and easier
  • Model an analysis and export it to Python for further improvement
  • Create Python functions from exported scripts using ArcToolbox tools to avoid repetitive code
  • Update the records of interest in your existing geospatial data automatically using data cursors
  • Add new geospatial data to existing datasets automatically from field-collected data or data produced during analysis
  • Export formatted analysis results to spreadsheets automatically
  • Update map documents with analysis-generated data and export maps to PDF or image formats
  • Create geometric networks and analyze routes using scripts

Who This Book Is For

If you are a GIS student or professional who needs an understanding of how to use ArcPy to reduce repetitive tasks and perform analysis faster, this book is for you. It is also a valuable book for Python programmers who want to understand how to automate geospatial analyses.

Geospatial Semantic Web

Geospatial Semantic Web

Geospatial Semantic Web
by Chuanrong Zhang, Tian Zhao, Weidong Li

This book covers key issues related to Geospatial Semantic Web, including geospatial web services for spatial data interoperability; geospatial ontology for semantic interoperability; ontology creation, sharing, and integration; querying knowledge and information from heterogeneous data source; interfaces for Geospatial Semantic Web, VGI (Volunteered Geographic Information) and Geospatial Semantic Web; challenges of Geospatial Semantic Web; and development of Geospatial Semantic Web applications. This book also describes state-of-the-art technologies that attempt to solve these problems such as WFS, WMS, RDF, OWL and GeoSPARQL and demonstrates how to use the Geospatial Semantic Web technologies to solve practical real-world problems such as spatial data interoperability.

What are geospatial technologies

About the technologies

Geospatial technologies is a term used to describe the range of modern tools contributing to the geographic mapping and analysis of the Earth and human societies. These technologies have been evolving in some form since the first maps were drawn in prehistoric times. In the 19th century, the long important schools of cartography and mapmaking were joined by aerial photography as early cameras were sent aloft on balloons and pigeons, and then on airplanes during the 20th century. The science and art of photographic interpretation and map making was accelerated during the Second World War and during the Cold War it took on new dimensions with the advent of satellites and computers. Satellites allowed images of the Earth’s surface and human activities therein with certain limitations. Computers allowed storage and transfer of imagery together with the development of associated digital software, maps, and data sets on socioeconomic and environmental phenomena, collectively called geographic information systems (GIS). An important aspect of a GIS is its ability to assemble the range of geospatial data into a layered set of maps which allow complex themes to be analyzed and then communicated to wider audiences. This ‘layering’ is enabled by the fact that all such data includes information on its precise location on the surface of the Earth, hence the term ‘geospatial’.

Especially in the last decade, these technologies have evolved into a network of national security, scientific, and commercially operated satellites complemented by powerful desktop GIS. In addition, aerial remote sensing platforms, including unmanned aerial vehicles (e.g. the GlobalHawk reconnaissance drone), are seeing increased non-military use as well. High quality hardware and data is now available to new audiences such as universities, corporations, and non-governmental organizations. The fields and sectors deploying these technologies are currently growing at a rapid pace, informing decision makers on topics such as industrial engineering, biodiversity conservation, forest fire suppression, agricultural monitoring, humanitarian relief, and much more.

There are now a variety of types of geospatial technologies potentially applicable to human rights, including the following:

  • Remote Sensing: imagery and data collected from space- or airborne camera and sensor platforms. Some commercial satellite image providers now offer images showing details of one-meter or smaller, making these images appropriate for monitoring humanitarian needs and human rights abuses.
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS): a suite of software tools for mapping and analyzing data which is georeferenced (assigned a specific location on the surface of the Earth, otherwise known as geospatial data). GIS can be used to detect geographic patterns in other data, such as disease clusters resulting from toxins, sub-optimal water access, etc.
  • Global Positioning System (GPS): a network of U.S. Department of Defense satellites which can give precise coordinate locations to civilian and military users with proper receiving equipment (note: a similar European system called Galileo will be operational within the next several years while a Russian system is functioning but restricted).
  • Internet Mapping Technologies: software programs like Google Earth and web features like Microsoft Virtual Earth are changing the way geospatial data is viewed and shared. The developments in user interface are also making such technologies available to a wider audience whereas traditional GIS has been reserved for specialists and those who invest time in learning complex software programs.

See detail – http://www.aaas.org